Windows 10: the blocking for the 2004 version is lifted on the Surface

Technology: Microsoft was preventing certain Surface devices from updating to the 2004 version due to technical issues. The blockade was lifted on June 29.
Microsoft releases the block it placed on certain Surface devices to prevent them from updating to version 2004. This block prevented users of certain Surface models manufactured by Microsoft, including Surface Laptop 3 and Surface Pro 7, from downloading and manually install the latest Windows 10 feature update.

According to information released as part of the May 2020 update, devices with more than one network adapter capable of operating in "Always On, Always Connected" mode may experience unexpected shutdowns and reboots. The Surface Laptop 3 and Surface Pro 7 both fall into this category. (Other surface devices can also be included; I asked Microsoft for a list of affected devices, but got no response).



Several technical problems when launching the updateEven though a patch (KB4557957) was released on June 9 as part of …

Without flexibility, the energy revolution in Africa will not take place

Renewable energies are and will remain affordable and reliable; they will be combined with flexible, quick-start power generation resources such as motors, which operate to meet peaks in demand, and compensate for intermittency. It is no longer disputable that the energy transition integrating renewable energies into the electricity production network is a reality that is unfolding globally. This can be seen at different rates and scales in different countries, but the constant increase in demand and the continuous fall in the prices of these technologies will imply that renewable energies will form the basis of power for the electricity networks in the future.
 
Without flexibility, the energy revolution in Africa will not take place

This is actually more of a revolution than a transition, given the dazzling speed with which the share of renewables is growing today, and the already noted fall in prices for the renewable kWh produced.

The same goes for the African continent, and in particular in North and West Africa, where Egypt, Morocco and Senegal have already embarked, on admittedly different scales, in the introduction of energies solar and wind turbines. If for example the projects in Egypt are large, they remain marginal compared to the installed capacity, while Senegal already includes 18% of renewable in its energy mix and has the ambition to reach 30% in 10 years.

However, since renewable energies are intermittent in nature, they generate instability on electricity grids, posing enormous difficulties for operators, and potentially consumers, as a result. Non-flexible production capacities, typically coal-fired, will therefore have to be replaced by much more flexible means of production. We will have to rely on a mix of energy storage solutions and engine-based technologies, which provide the best response times, to effectively adapt to sudden excess or shortfall in renewable production.




Interestingly, the Covid-19 crisis, and its confinement phases, give us a taste of what awaits us in 2030 in Africa. We observe in real time a full-scale simulation of the effects of a majority of renewables in the energy production mix. As demand for electricity falls in Europe due to containment measures, renewable generation facilities continue to produce just in time. As a result, production tools such as coal become the adjustment variable and are stopped when possible, which very significantly increases the relative importance of renewable energies in the production fleet.

For example, in the United Kingdom, over the period March 10 to April 10, the share of renewables reached 43% of production, while at the same time in 2019, it was 10%! At the same time, the share of electricity produced by coal-fired power plants fell by 35%. At the end of the month, all the coal plants were shut down. In Germany, over the same period, the share of renewables reached 60% of production, up 12%, while the share of electricity produced by coal-fired plants fell by 44%. At the end of April, the share of renewables reached almost 80% several days in a row, when at the same time the weather was very nice and there was a lot of wind. For 3 days, Germany even had to pay to massively export its excess electricity, unable to adjust its "inflexible" production tool.

The main lesson to be learned? The speed of the energy transition imposes additional criteria in the investment choices to ensure the sustainability and the best economic profitability of a country's energy network. The adequacy between the types of technologies in the energy mix, production costs and consumption have radically changed with the massive introduction of renewable energies. Even more today than before, the production price of a kWh in fine is only optimized by cleverly combining the different technologies for the best performance, the least risk of interruption, whatever the development. consumption.


Predictions show that by 2050, photovoltaic solar could account for more than 50% of total electricity production in Africa. Renewable energies are and will remain affordable and reliable; they will be combined with flexible, quick-start power generation resources such as motors, which operate to meet peaks in demand, and compensate for intermittency. These engines also provide additional security, because they can work just as well on gas as on fuel in the event of a gas supply shortage, but also ultimately on bio-fuels when these become economically competitive and widely available.

Introducing a high degree of flexibility into our electricity production is not an option if we want to give pride of place to renewable energy. Without flexibility, the energy revolution will not take place.