FinCEN Files: Investigation into Dirty Money Transfers from Major Global Banks

At least $ 2 trillion in suspicious transactions were carried out between 2000 and 2017 by several major global banks. This is what an investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, made up of 400 journalists from the media in 88 countries, including the investigation units of Radio France and the newspaper Le Monde, reveals.
For their investigation, ICIJ journalists were able to obtain "suspicious activity reports". These are top-secret documents that US bank internal compliance officials send to US financial intelligence agencies when they detect questionable money transfers.

According to these documents, 2,000 billion dollars in suspicious transactions may have been carried out. It is dirty money linked to drugs, corruption, organized crime and terrorism.

Large banks are singled out like JP Morgan, Deutsche Bank, Bank of New York Mellon or HSBC. They ensure, however, that they make significant efforts to combat financial crime an…

Confinement: "Not a single Orange employee was partially unemployed, the company assumed all of its employees", specifies Stéphane Richard, CEO of Orange

The coronavirus crisis has had serious consequences for the economy. Many employees have been placed on partial unemployment, which represents a significant cost for the State. "Not a single Orange employee was partially unemployed, the company has assumed all of its employees," said Thursday May 28 on franceinfo Stéphane Richard, CEO of Orange. "Orange does not use any public funding," he continues. "We did not use short-time working, we paid all of our employees and we guaranteed them all of their remuneration including in the variable part . "
 
Confinement: "Not a single Orange employee was partially unemployed, the company assumed all of its employees", specifies Stéphane Richard, CEO of Orange

Everyone who works in our stores continued to be paid in full. We felt that we owed this solidarity to all our employees.
Stéphane Richard




Several big bosses announced that they were going to lower their remuneration as a sign of support. "I have not made this decision yet," said Stéphane Richard, CEO of Orange, who says he is also the last in the CAC 40 in terms of compensation. "I want to have more visibility. If I feel I have to do it I will do it."

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