Apple: the next iMac would adopt a new design and an Apple Silicon processor this year

For the first time since 2012, Apple would finally renew the design of its iMac. In 2021, Apple is preparing at least three new desktop Macs. According to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman, who also released information on future MacBook Pros and iPhone 12 successors in recent days, Apple will announce an iMac and two Mac Pros in 2021. The transition to Apple Silicon processors gives a new blows to the computers of the Californian giant.     iMac: finally an edge-to-edge screen This year, the iMac could change completely. Mark Gurman indicates that the borders of his screen would be much smaller, like Pro Display XDR, the ultra high-end screen launched by Apple with the Mac Pro in 2019. The back of the computer would also abandon the curvature in favor of a completely flat frame.  This new iMac would also be equipped with an Apple Silicon processor, probably a more powerful chip than the Apple M1 chip currently present in the MacBook Air, MacBook Pro and Mac mini. The 2021 iMac is reportedly

Google's transatlantic cable arrives in Vendée

The 6000 km long cable will connect Virginia, the United States, to France. On this side of the Atlantic, he will land in Saint-Hilaire-de-Riez in Vendée. Whenever a European internet user types into a Google search, sends an email to Gmail, or watches a video on YouTube, they consume bandwidth between the Old Continent and the United States.

Google's transatlantic cable


And as data consumption continues to grow, the networks of telecom operators are increasingly congested. Google, like its competitors in Gafam Facebook and Microsoft, has therefore decided to invest massively in their own submarine cables, real freeways of the global internet. Facebook and Microsoft have teamed up to extend a transatlantic cable called "Marea" in 2019.


In 2020, Google’s turn to build its own, dubbed "Dunant" in tribute to the creator of the Red Cross, Henry Dunant. And as the American group likes to think big, its cable gathers 12 pairs of fibers (against 6 or 8 usually), "which will allow it to reach an unmatched average transmission speed: 250 terabits per second, against 160 for Marea ”, reports Sciences et Avenir. It’s almost 10 times more than the old submarine cables. The 6,000 km long cable will connect Virginia, the United States, to France. On this side of the Atlantic, he will land in Saint-Hilaire-de-Riez in Vendée. Orange, responsible for installing the French part and connecting it to the French internet network, has just laid the first meters of cable on the beach.