Coronavirus: United Kingdom, facing worst recession on record, sees GDP drop 20.4% in Q2

The UK has seen its economy, hit by the coronavirus crisis, suffer a "record" contraction of 20.4% in the second quarter, and is officially facing its worst recession on record, agency figures show National Statistics (ONS), published Wednesday 12 August. 
Economists consider that a country enters a technical recession when it accumulates two consecutive quarters of contraction in its economy. According to the ONS, most of the contraction, which began to be felt in March, occurred in April, an entire month of containment and almost total cessation of activity in the country, which saw production collapsed by 20%.

With a very early recovery in construction sites and manufacturing activity, gross domestic product (GDP) rebounded in May by 2.4% (revised figure), followed by an acceleration in June (+8.7 %) thanks in particular to the reopening of all shops. This is the biggest contraction in the UK economy since the ONS began these quarterly statistics in 1955, he said…

Britain: who paid for Boris Johnson's luxury vacation?

British parliamentary committee of the House of Commons responsible for ensuring compliance with the rules of parliamentary life has opened an investigation into the Prime Minister's luxury Caribbean vacation.

Britain: who paid for Boris Johnson's luxury vacation?

A British parliamentary committee has opened an investigation into Prime Minister Boris Johnson's luxury Caribbean vacation to find out who paid for it, British press reported on Sunday. According to the weekly "The Observer", the parliamentary committee of the House of Commons responsible for ensuring compliance with the rules of parliamentary life opened its investigation earlier this week. Boris Johnson and his fiancee Carrie Symonds, who announced at the end of February that they are expecting a child, spent the New Year on the private island Moustique, in the Caribbean Grenadines.


In his declaration of interest as a member of parliament, the Prime Minister said that this vacation, worth 15,000 pounds (17,300 euros), had been offered to him by businessman David Ross, a donor to the Conservative Party. But David Ross sowed confusion by denying, at first, having given such a sum to Boris Johnson, before going back on his statements through his spokesperson to affirm that it was a "Natural Advantage". The Labor Party, the main opposition party, has urged the commission to open an investigation. Downing Street, which had previously pointed out that it had declared everything in form, declined to comment on the announcement.